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  • daviding 9:56 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/11 10:35 Panel, ISIE SIEYP, U. Surrey 

    Panel of @MingXuUMich, @cbdvs, Noa Meron, @weslynneashton, Megha Shenoy at the “ISIE Symposium on Industrial Ecology for Young Professionals“, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 11, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    [Moderated by Jonathan Krones, from MIT Engineering Systems Division]

    Where is Industrial Ecology going next?


    DI_20150711 043642 SIEYP panel

    Ming Xu, U. Michigan, student chapter since 2006

    • A few months ago, co-edited special issue on Complex Adaptive Systems
    • Article on big data, don’t like the title big data, but catchy title
    • Computational and data-driven approach
    • IE has seen more and more interest and potential from computational and data-driven approaches
    • New sources of data are becoming available due to ICT devices, social media data
    • Most important is the method that big data guys use

    Chris Davis, U. Groningen

    • Work in data, data for sustainability
    • The future is already here, it’s just not evenly distributed
    • Look at papers
    • Work on open data, machine learning
    • Working with industrial symbiosis data, so less frustrating
    • Have alpha geeks who play with this, then people who are scared
    • Did a bachelor degree in computer science, but now things have become more mature
    • We have to get better at using the tools
    • Tools help think more about automation
    • Chris was talking about plumbing, we’re data plumbers
    • Supply and demand of data sets
    • Big data is people don’t know what it is, talking to people who don’t know what it is
    • Open data, Open Street Map is 50GB downloadable
    • Power grids, government won’t release as scared
    • Should also talk about small data: machine learning, teach computers
    • LCA and IO analysis, maybe should think outside the matrix, matrix isn’t the best data
    • Crowdsource data on power plants, thought people would rush in, mostly me
    • Sculptor:  can see Russian power plants at night

    Noa Meron, Tel Aviv U.

    • IE background, good at looking a production types, know much less about consumer side, in use phase, consumer choices, demand
    • Must invest more in understanding consumers
    • Then go back and convert for use in IE
    • Where should we expand
    • Should encourage other fields to IE tools, we have great studies, but what about policies
    • Now in business school, trying to encourage decision-making

    Weslynne Ashton, Illinois Institute of Technology

    • Originally from Trinidad-Tobago, now in the U.S.
    • Ph.D. at Yale
    • Now at IIT, host of next conference
    • One of few IE Ph.D.s ending up in business schools
    • How can business use industrial ecology?
    • 1. IE started as an applied discipline, understanding environment impact, transforming an industrial system
    • Using data, trying to get data from the production side
    • Need to be in closer dialogue with industry
    • A piece missing:  communicate more effectively with decision-makers into something usable
    • Not all IE students will end up in universities
    • Have met 2 former Ph.Ds. in industry at this conference:  they found gems that are useful, that they would have to spend thousand of dollars in a research group, and industry is five years behind; but they have industrial ecology training, the average business person won’t look for gems
    • 2. Most of work is in industrial symbiosis
    • Kalundborg is seen as cute; is it serious?
    • Most research into industrial symbiosis has been case studies, can we compare?
    • Industrial symbiosis as a subfield of IE is maturing.
    • Can apply LCA, agent-based modeling
    • Many are now taking a social science perspective
    • As a study, heard materials don’t flow, people move them:  so why is a business interested in moving a material from place A to place B?
    • Industrial symbosis is growing up
    • 3. In developing countries, there’s a lots of things similar to IE
    • Reach out to developing countries, address problems with research

    Megha Shenoy, independent sustainability researcher, India

    • Started in industrial psychology
    • Focused on industrial ecology
    • Did a postdoc at Yale
    • Went back to India in 2009 to work on IE in India, great that was already an organization there
    • Lot of resistance from industry and policy makers to not taking path that developed countries have, that create waste and then have to clean up
    • Most immediate problems of policy makers can’t be addressed by IE specialties
    • Go first to find problems they’re interested in
    • Data, how to recognize problems, and try to solve them
    • Data in developing countries is limited, a gap
    • Consider data downsizing, picking out the most important things, so developing countries can select a few things
    • Economic instruments and structures:  there’s a lot of international debt, then getting locked in with energy-intensive resources
    • Lifting people from poverty

    [Questions]

    Engage scholars?

    • Do some research, engage people
    • Interest in workshops, seminars
    • Need to be out there

    Business engagement?

    • Society has wanted more business engagement for some time
    • Meat of research has shifted to be more academic
    • Yet people do have connections to business, sometimes to get student projects, sometimes told to, sometimes for funding
    • Engagement as society is tougher, because what we’re doing
    • 8 tracks, 15 minutes, isn’t great to bring business people in
    • Need to figure this out, how to mesh
    • Two-year conference is designed for science side
    • People tend to ask why work isn’t impacting policy, without understanding the logic of policy, engagement of stakeholders
    • It’s better to be an expert of something useful to policy world, then will be invited in
    • Other view:  can we do this type of work, and will it fit with professional development:  can we get promoted for this work?  What is recognized by university?
    • Journal welcomes application implementation, would like to know that tools helped, or IE tries to do something engaged
    • Can’t be a simple narrative, it has to be conceptually well-grounded
    • Work to be done talking about IE to non-science, policy world, don’t get enough on that

    In future conferences, have more interactive or educational sessions?  Why not go to other conferences, too?

    • Difficult starting from where we are now, moving towards policy
    • Multiple layers
    • Learned at environment engineering conference, there’s a lot of channels from social engineering
    • More people read tweets than journal articles
    • A lot of journalists are also scientists

    Big data yes, but make something big out of small data:

     

     
  • daviding 9:53 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/11 10:00 Reid Lifset, “From Oxymoron to Interdisciplinary Field: The Origins and Prospects for Industrial Ecology”, ISIE SIEYP, U. Surrey 

    Talk by Reid Lifset, Yale U. at the “ISIE Symposium on Industrial Ecology for Young Professionals“, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 11, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    [Moderated by Jonathan Krones, from MIT Engineering Systems Division]


    Reid Lifset is Research Scholar and Resident Fellow, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and Editor in Chief of the Journal of Industrial Ecology

    [Reid Lifset]

    Backstory and context

    Frosch and Gallopolous, “Strategies for Manufacturing” Scientific American 1989 had a different name

    • Also Bob Ayres work in American Economic Review in 1989
    • Frosch was head of R&D at GM; also NASA; U.N. Economic Development Program
    • Interest in 1960s U.S.
    • Pioneering investment in the 1970s:  not just in energy, but also in material resources, with ambitious reports to congress

    Then when Ronald Reagan was elected, everything stopped

    • Energy markets plummetted in the 1980s
    • 1980s concern on soil contamination, remediation, assigning responsiblity for cleaning contanimnated sites
    • Late 1980s, resource availability, recycling — quiet
    • Concerns about environmental quaility, air pollution, water pollution
    • Discourse about expense of environment remediation cost
    • U.S. Academy of Engineering coming out of that environment
    • Desire to do it right in the first place, so society doesn’t have massive costs
    • Little discourse about climate
    • Brundtland Report was 1987, discussion sustainability hasn’t started

    In Europe and Nordics, interest in industrial/societal metabolism

    • U.S. NAE colloquium
    • AT&T with Tom Graedel and others, twisted arm of philanthropy to respond to U.S. NAE
    • Life cycle assessment started in the late 1960s, concerns on packaging, so Coke went to predecessor of Franklin Associates, Midwest Research Institute out of Kansas City, to counter NGOs concerned about one-way packaging
    • Locus on LCA shifted from U.S. to Europe, UK and elsewhere
    • Cleaner production people from Northern Europe:  solid waste, shifted upstream to generation and entire product life cycle; with another thread coming out from toxics, focused on substances, mostly at the facilities level
    • Marina Fischer-Kowalski talks of intellectual history on industry-social metabolism:  Paul Brunner, TU Vienna wrote “Metabolism of the Anthroposphere”; Bob Ayres through U.N. Press wrote “Industrial Metabolism”.
    • Then Kalundborg was discovered, had been operating for some time, picked up by Newsweek, then one of John Ehrenfeld’s master’s student wrote an article in the first JIE

    Another piece coming out of biofuel energy:  sulfur cycles

    • How things cycle at a global level, playing into substance flow analysis

    Institutionalization

    • Tom Graedel had came from 1997 in AT&T, first professor of IE
    • First textbook
    • Journal started in 1997 before society; industrial ecology was hot, everyone said they were doing it (relabelling what they were doing); feared that consultants would fill out the society, and IE would become a mushy area
    • Society started in 2001

    Used to introduce field as Industrial Ecology is industrial

    • At that time, focus was on industry
    • Can industry be an actor that plays, rather than being villain
    • Future-oriented, design-oriented, was in industrial sector where decisions were made

    Industrial ecology is ecology

    • Carrying capacity
    • Anthroposphere and the larger system in which it’s enclosed
    • Were we exceed the carrying capacity of the earth?
    • Before ecological footprint

    Moving from linear to circular flows (Graedel)

    • a Type II Industrial Ecosystem

    These were central to the field in the first decade

    • Do the analogies in natural systems line up with the way the economy work
    • Ecosystem ecology, systems ecology — flows through the system
    • Lots of debates
    • John Ehrenfeld, a key leader, leader in Environmental Business and Society program at MIT, said had to develop this, as it’s really central
    • Ehrenfeld didn’t have his way
    • But it’s now coming back in Circular Economy

    Is Circular Economy just a metaphor?

    • Reviving this idea
    • 1976 Loop Economy, Walter Sockel
    • 1993 Swedes were using closed loops in policy
    • 1991 Cradle to Cradle earliest version
    • 2000 Japan’s Basic Acdt for Establishing a Sound Matierail-Cycle Society
    • 2009 China’s Circulat Economony Promotion Law (learning from Sweden)
    • 2009 Kore’s National Strategy for Green Growth  and Five year Plan
    • 2010 Ellen MacArthur Foundation
    • 2011 Morioka, Hanaki & Moriguchi, Establishing a Resource-Circulating Socity in Asia
    • Also had Benyus, Biomimicry, but analogy

    Industrial Ecology emphasizes:

    • Systems approach, sometimes plays out in life cycle approach, and sometimes in mass balance in materials accounting
    • Impact of technology
    • Preventitive strategies

    Elements of Industrial Ecology

    • In the first 5 to 10 years, it was advocated as the “next best thing to sliced bread”
    • A lot of ideas now compeeting with IE hadn’t yet emerged
    • World was worried about water and air pollution, and IE says you don’t want to look at one toxic substance or one life cycle stage
    • Greg Allenby:  made really ambitious claims for IE, as the central framework for everything in the environment
    • So, saw scaling back of ambition

    Industrial Ecology at various scales

    • Emergence of looking at materials and energy at different scale

    Now in the world, where everyone offers their own label

    • Some have stayed, some are new
    • The Natural Step:  former student had been a CEO of national section, still active in Sweden and Canada

    The field has become more modelled

    • Less attached to industry
    • Pieces most accessible to industry, e.g. life cycle assessment, is central to the field
    • Doing more input-output analysis
    • Have to do more translation for business

    [Questions]

    Progress in IE journal?

    • Started by an ambitious guy in Finland
    • Published a lot of interesting work, impatient
    • Editorial strategy or it’s what he got?

    How to bring a social science perspective, questioning the purpose of IE, how to be more diverse

    • Exhortations to bring social science to IE
    • Have pieces of that
    • Challenge:  how to expand the scope of IE, and still keep its divinity
    • Need a central thread to stay together as a field
    • A lot of work in social science is bringing social impact; others are bringing social theory

     
  • daviding 9:46 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/11 09:30 Chris Kennedy, “The Plumbing for a New Industrial Ecology”, ISIE SIEYP, U. Surrey 

    Talk by Chris Kennedy, U. of Toronto, at the “ISIE Symposium on Industrial Ecology for Young Professionals“, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 11, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    [Moderated by Jonathan Krones, from MIT Engineering Systems Division]

    Welcome

    • ISIE meeting was taking stock
    • SIEYP is looking forward, where IE is going next

    Chris Kennedy is Professor, Civil Engineering at the U. of Toronto, and President of the International Society for Industrial Ecology

    DI_20150711 035447 SIEYP ChrisKennedy

    [Chris Kennedy]

    Some work that is incomplete

    • Focused in infrastructure
    • Overlaps other parts of IE

    Title part of idea from OECD

    • A new industrial field
    • Ecosystem that goes around industry

    Start with Kalundborg, Denmark

    • Previous conference talks focused on oil refinery and electric power stations
    • But don’t want to focus there, because the future may not be around oil and electric

    DI_20150711 034646 SIEYP ChrisKennedy GlobalEnergyUse

    Work at different scales

    • Map of global energy system by Cullen and Allwood
    • Want final servies (e.g. transport), but we don’t like the old energy sources
    • Conversion devices will have to change
    • Leaders setting up from there

    Stefan Pauliuk presentation:

    • Link infrastructure systems to their material use
    • Others working on global input-output models
    • Ming working on Infrastructure Ecology, could fit in here, too

    DI_20150711 034727 SIEYP ChrisKennedy CarbonEmissionsOfInfrastructureDev

    Kennedy and Corfee-Morlot 2012 OECD work done as an economist, learning from industrial ecology over the year

    • From an economic perspective, how could we achieve a low carbon economy?
    • If we had the policies to promote energy efficiencies, then we no longer need to invest in the infrastructure that carries oil and natural gas
    • If decrease investment in oil and natural gas, the capital we free up needs to go into low carbon electricity generation, which makes vehicles low carbon as well
    • Result:  decrease demand for coal and oil, then don’t need to move coal and oil
    • Then can have some big infrastructure savings, particularly in countries that don’t already have them
    • Rail and ports are big infrastructure
    • Costing, enough to get working paper with OECD

    DI_20150711 035227 SIEYP ChrisKennedy ChinasGreenInvestmentNeeds

    Now working with OECD and government of China, about financing green investment in China

    • Working on Chapter 2, with colleague in Chinese university
    • (Numbers wrong, keep changing)
    • Chinese government really understands changing to an ecological civilization
    • Factor of 10 beyond U.S. superfund to clean up
    • Chart only shows to 2020, report will go beyond that
    • What’s missing is a trillion dollars for an industry treatment of waste coming out of solid, gaseous, liquid waste
    • This is just the investment in green stuff
    • Haven’t yet got data on savings in investment they won’t do

    DI_20150711 035429 SIEYP ChrisKennedy ChinasWindPower MatthewsTan

    Matthew and Tan 2014:  China’s Wind Power

    • Getting steeper and steeper

    DI_20150711 035517 SIEYP ChrisKennedy ERI IRENA High Renewables

    ERI & IRENA High Renewals Scenarios

    • Wind and solar means by 2050, oil and coal is reduced by 75%
    • Plan to do high renewalbles in China

    DI_20150711 035612 SIEYP ChrisKennedy China2050HighRenewable

    China’s primary energy consumption, ERI 2015

    • Coal peaks in 2020, if it already hasn’t
    • Is this possible thermodynamically, economically, socially?

    DI_20150711 035636 SIEYP ChrisKennedy ChinasPrimaryEnergyConsumption

    Typical day in China:  power from solar goes up during the day

    Costs:  Wind power is now competitive with coal power in China

    • Coal costs would go up with infrastructure and environmental costs

    Readapted Kennedy and Corfee-Morlot 2012, 2013 for China

    • Could poke holes in this
    • Link between coal and railway, in the context of a country that is still growing
    • China is impressive
    • UK to U.S. to China from industrial revolution scale goes up
    • China already has more high-speed rail than others

    China has a Medium to Long-term Railway Network Plan, in the context  of China 2050 High Renewal Energy Penetration Scneario and Roadmap Study (2015)

    • 112,000 to 250,000km in 2050
    • But 50% of rail traffic is coal
    • What if coal demand goes down 75%

    DI_20150711 035741 SIEYP ChrisKennedy HourlyDispatchOfNationalwidePowerGeneration

    The amount of iron ore required to build 200km of dedicated freight ral lines is equivalent to 2000GW of onshore wind turbines

    • That’s close to the envisaged wind power for 2050
    • Want someone to redo the China railway plan, taking account of industrial ecology
    • Could then do this for India, for the U.S.

    DI_20150711 035809 SIEYP ChrisKennedy PowerCostsUnderERI

    The go back to industrial symbiosis

    DI_20150711 035851 SIEYP ChrisKennedy InteractionsBetweenInfrastructureSectors

    [Questions]

    Save steel by not building rails, but what about other energy storage technologies?

    • That’s for you to research
    • To be done
    • Fast high speed rail is sustainable, supported by electricity
    • Coal and steam engines are intensive

    What about the U.S.?

    • As 4 to 5 years ago, 45% of rail tonnage is coal
    • It’s mature, shrinking rather than growing
     
  • daviding 9:38 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/09 10:25 Marlyne Sakahian, “The Social and Solidarity Economy: Why is it Relevant to Industrial Ecology?”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Marlyne Sakahian, University of Lausanne, at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Marlyne Sakahian is a post-doctoral researcher at University of Lausanne, Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics (IDYST)

    [Marlyne Sakahian]

    Why a social and solidarity economy?

    • Capitalism isn’t working
    • Carbon

    Another world is possible

    Travel back to 19th century

    • Transform from biomass and coal through industrial revolution
    • Polanyi:  transformation, stark utopia of market liberalism
    • Poverty and urban centres
    • A lot of innovation
    • Start of the social economy

    1990s: similar trends, in social economy (Lafuentu and Freundlich, 2012)

    • Add solidarity to label
    • Mondragon: 74000 worker, Spain’s 12th largest organization
    • Coop principles

    What is it?

    • Citizen engagement, social and/or environmental goals
    • Reciprocity, based on voluntary interdependent people
    • Democritization of economy

    Geneva:  Charter and chamber in place for 278 members

    DI_20150709 043619 ISIE plenary MarlyneSakahian TheSharingEconomyInRelationToSolidarity

    Comparing to the sharing economy?

    • In book, also complementary currencies
    • Sharewashing, comparable to greenwashing

    DI_20150709 043739 ISIE plenary MarlyneSakahian TheSharingEconomyInRelationToIndustrialSymbiosis

    Beyond Ostrom

    • Not sharing the pie, putting the pie into the commons
    • Different from end-of-pipe sharing

     
  • daviding 9:34 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/09 10:05 Megha Senoy, “Industrial Ecology in Developing Countries”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Megha Senoy, Resource Optimization Initiative, at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Megha Shenoy, Ph.D. is the research director of Resource Optimization Initiative (ROI), Bangalore, India, and a Visiting Fellow of the Center for Industrial Ecology, Yale University, USA

    [Megha Senoy]

    Covering more than half the world, in developing countries

    First, taking stock

    • IE in India, 1977 to 2011:  130 documents

    Megha Shenoy

     
  • daviding 9:31 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/09 09:45 Walter Stahel and Roland Clift, “Stocks and Flows in the Performance Economy”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Roland Clift @CES_Surrey, and Walter Stahel, The Product-Life Institute, at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Walter Stahel is Founder and Director of the Product-Life Institute, in Geneva

    Roland Clift is Emeritus Professor of Environmental Technology, University of Surrey

    [Roland Clift]

    Talk contains circular economy, called performance economy

    • Circular economy focuses on flows, not stocks

    DI_20150709 034611 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift Stock Flow

    People still struggle with stocks and flows

    • Ellen Macarthur Foundation has been successful in getting circular economy out, but not understood
    • They published “the wealth of flows”, confusing

    Mainly focused on developed world economies

    DI_20150709 034719 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift PerformanceEconomy

    Performance economy starts with the stocks

    • What’s the best way to get the best performance from the stocks?  Then use flows to maintain
    • When stock gets to the point when you can’t use it?  Washing machine breaks down, try to replace bearings, but if can’t, then replace
    • Recycling and remanufacturing are two different things
    • Stock use and recycling is in local economy
    • Remanufacturing means localizing the activity, generating local employment
    • Advocating labour productivity means low employment
    • How to switch from energy to labour as a principle factor in production

    Gaia relationship

    • IPCC report is wrong, they changed it after Clift wrote
    • To deliver a service, need some intensity, i.e. a stock
    • To maintain the S, need to a flow
    • To produce, need some energy
    • Usually, remanuacturing uses less resources than recycling, which requires less than primary production
    • Lifetime of stock

    Thus, priority order to reduce energy use and emission

    • Extend life is best

    Then, discuss distance issues

    [Walter Stahel]

    Rebound effect is most relevant is the money goes into flows

    • If money goes into stocks, then there isn’t so much of an issue with rebound effects

    Maintaining the quality of manufacturing stock at its highest value will mean a new science

    • Upgrading components (microchips)
    • Recycling atoms by de-alloying

    3 pillars of managing manufactured stocks

    • OEM manufacturing skills: Can produce in China and ship elsewhere, but can’t maintain it that way
    • Retained ownership of goods:  Will try to prevent costs, and gives resource security, no compliance costs and no transaction costs
    • Operation and maintenance skills

    DI_20150709 035007 ISIE plenary WalterStahel EnergyRequiredToMaintainStock

    Can’t sell a tire service without local, as retreading

    DI_20150709 035144 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift ReprocessingAndRecycling

    Mining with molecules as services?

    DI_20150709 035200 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift PerformanceEconomy TotalInterventions

    Performance economy needs new metrics

    • value per weight
    • manpower input per weight
    • (then don’t have to look at flows)

    DI_20150709 035334 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift PriorityOrder

    DI_20150709 035524 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift MaintainingQualityOfManufacturedStock

    1976 report to EC was substituting manpower for energy

    • I/O analysis on Dutch and Spanish economies, means that CO2 down 70%, increase in employment
    • Labour-intensive regional economy, don’t tax non-renewal resources; tax renewal resources

    DI_20150709 035849 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift BusinessModelInPerformanceEconomy

    DI_20150709 040231 ISIE plenary WalterStahel RolandClift ValueAndLabourInput

    For a copy of the 2010 ebook version of Performance Economy, send an e-mail

     
  • daviding 9:19 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/09 09:20 Tim Baynes, “A Socio-economic Metabolism Approach to Sustainable Development and Climate Change Mitigation”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Tim Baynes, CSIRO at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Tim Baynes is a researcher at CSIRO, and with The Australian National University, Canberra.

    [Tim Baynes]

    How socio-economic metabolism can help mitigate climate change

    Global Urban Population 2030, will all need stuff

    • Developed world has stuff, don’t need much
    • Developing world is going to need a lot of stuff, driven by population
    • Cities come from large towns, then need a public transport system, which is stuff-intensive
    • Buildings are CO2 intensive

    What are chances of realizing a 2-degree target?

    • For 50% chance of a 2-degree target, would require really restrictive policies
    • About 2/3 of emissions are coming from transport, buildings, industry and the use of that stuff

    DI_20150709 032928 ISIE plenary TimBaynes SustainableDevelopment CarbonBudget

    How tight is the carbon budget?

    • A lot of countries have a lot of per capita CO2
    • If we’re going to let less developed countries have transportation, etc., there’s a lot of infrastructural cost, up to 1/3 of the total carbon budget

    DI_20150709 033303 ISIE plenary TimBaynes Socio-Metabolic Framework

    Socio-economic metabolic framework

    • Aluminum:  a lot of scrap that never makes its way to consumers

    Material stocks are not just residual flows

    • Need more information of inputs – outputs
    • Service that stock provides to society?
    • Quality of stock?
    • Material stock for mansion for 2 people is same as for apartment with 6 units
    • A lot of highly depreciated roads that aren’t maintained is the same as a new fresh highway largely used

    Controversial:  measuring our physical wealth

    • Good economists don’t measure wealth in terms of flows (e.g. GDP)
    • There’s assets and liabilities
    • Assets have measured wealth
    • In environment science, do measure flows, and have stocks in land and natural resources — but should add fixed capital stock in cities development, not well-developed

    Go to Gordon Research Conference in Vermont, June 2014

     
  • daviding 9:14 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    2015/07/09 09:00 Chris Kennedy, “Industrial Ecology and Cities”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Chris Kennedy, U. of Toronto, at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Chris Kennedy is Professor, Civil Engineering at the U. of Toronto, and President of the International Society for Industrial Ecology

    [Chris Kennedy]

    Minnesota Experimental City 1966-1973

    • No waste
    • Excluding industry
    • Guideway for cars
    • Water recycled
    • Buildings modular that could be reused
    • Fossil-fuel-free, maybe nuclear (not clear)
    • Otto Silhart, supported by vp Hubert Humphrey, Buckminister Fuller
    • Athelstan Spilhaus, South Africa, Woods Hole, dean of U. Minnesota Institute of Technology, comic strip, president of AAAS (1968 article in Science)
    • Waste is a something we don’t know how to use yet
    • Industrial symbiosis
    • None of this was done, came to nothing, a utopian vision
    • For 250,000 people, no more, no less
    • 1971 Minnesota governor created a center for tis

    Looking back on IE for work on cities

    • Gradel and Allenby 1995 two paragraphs

    Ernie Lowe’s book:  Discovering Industrial Ecology

    • Was talking with urban planners

    Allenby 1999:  “sustainable communities” yet science has yet to understand meaning

    Andrews 2002:  prescriptive IE … until grand visions tempered .. they will be a poor basis for public decisions

    Scopus search:  IE and cities, city, urban or urbanization

    • Gradual increase in JIE keyword to 2006
    • Then from 2007 increase in title-abstract-keyword
    • 212 papers, remove some in industrial eco parks just happening to be in cities

    Urban metabolism emerged as research separate from industrial metabolism

    • Both are parts of socio-economic metabolism

    Scopus study:  urban metabolism or metabolism of cities

    • Wolman 1965 off chart, then 1994, and 1999 start rise
    • Human Studies 1999

    Future directions:

    • Understand the environment impact of the urban metabolism and pursue plans to reduce them
    • Similar to Experimental Cities, but needs to be tempered

    Electric City:

    • Decarbonization, electric vehicles
    • Making cities resilient to climate change

    Key threshold for electrification associated with carbon intensity of electric, different below 600 than above 60

    Urban scale industrial symbiosis, e.g. van Berkel Fujita Hashimoto Fujii

    Bristow & Kennedy, JIE 2015 doi:10.1111/jiec.12239 :  What would rebound effect be?

    • Urbanization leads to increased energy use
    • If we build more cities, will we increase energy use?

    Image

     
  • daviding 9:10 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    2015/07/08 09:45 Moriguchi and Hashimoto, “Material Flow Analysis and Waste Management”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk of Yuichi Moriguchi and Seiji Hashimoto, at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Yuichi Moriguchi is Professor of Urban Resource Management, in the Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo.

    Seiji Hashimoto is Professor at Ritsumeikan University, and a Senior Researcher at National Institute for Environmental Studies.

    Overview of progress on economy-wide Material Flow Accounting, Fischer

    Books by Robert Ayres

     
  • daviding 9:06 pm on August 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    2015/07/08 10:10 Jeroen Guinée, “Past, Present and Future of Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment”, ISIE, U. Surrey 

    Plenary talk by Jeroen Guinée, Leiden University at “Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology”, 8th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, University of Surrey, Guildford, July 7-10, 2015

    This digest was created in real-time during the meeting, based on the speaker’s presentation(s) and comments from the audience. The content should not be viewed as an official transcript of the meeting, but only as an interpretation by a single individual. Lapses, grammatical errors, and typing mistakes may not have been corrected. Questions about content should be directed to the originator. The digest has been made available for purposes of scholarship by David Ing.

    Plenary talks for ISIE 2015 are by contributors to an open access volume, Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology, available online as open access e-book from Springer in fall 2015.  See the table of contents and the Springer book description.


    Jeroen Guinée is Senior researcher at Universiteit Leiden, Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML)

    [Jeroen Guinée]

    25 years in Leiden (NL):  SimaPro

    LCA: Past, present and Future, Environ Sci Technol 2011 46

    • LCA added economic and social analysis

    Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (the book chapter)

    • Past:  1987, 2007, conception of LCSA; 2007-2010: debates on what exactly is LCSA?
    • Present 2010-2015:  trial and error
    • Future:  2016-onwards: main challenges

    Past:

    • LCSA from Zhou et al. 2006/2007, where LCSA = LCA + LCC (which they didn’t use through the article), where LCC == carbon footprint
    • Klopffer & Remmer 2007:  LCSA = LCA + LCC + SLCA
    • Zamagni 209, Guienee 2011 expanded on above

    TBL ++

    • Broadening of impacts based on Triple Bottom Line

    Present, literature search

    • 23/30 broadening impacts
    • 11/30 broading analysis
    • 10/30 deepening

    Future

    • Broadening of impacts:  Proper qualitative and practical SLCA indicators
    • Broadening level of analysis:  Scenarios, emerging technology systems, products, futures
    • Deepending:  Dealing with uncertainties and rebound effects

    Modes of LCA / LCSA:

    • Attributional
    • Back-casting
    • Consequential
    • Decision or Dynamic
    • Exergy

     
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