“Field guide to the geology of the University of the West Indies campus, Mona”, Stephen K. Donovan and Trevor A. Jackson, Caribbean J. of Earth Sciences, 2000

Some explanations of the features seen on the drive around the U. West Indies campus, as I was snapping photographs.

The purpose of this field guide is to illustrate selected aspects of the “urban geology” of the Mona campus and the surrounding region. It is intended to provide an excursion for interested visitors to the campus and, particularly, to promote awareness of urban geological resources as an aid to teaching for students studying geology and/or physical geography at first year undergraduate level.

di_20130213_120356_kingstonjm_uwi_monument

The obelisk that stands outside the De la Beche Building (Fig. 2A) and adjacent to the ring road around campus was presented to the (then) Department of Geology by the Geological Society of Jamaica in 1984 (the succession is summarised in Table 1). It was erected in recognition of 21 years of the teaching of geology at UWI (1961-1982) (Porter, 1990, pp. 78- 82). This structure is not only a notable landmark on campus, but is also a highly functional aid to teaching. The cladding of the obelisk, built on a reinforced concrete core, is designed to represent the lithological succession of Jamaica, on a vertical scale of one foot (about 0.3 m) equivalent to 12 million years. Jamaican rocks from the Lower Cretaceous to Pleistocene are mounted in stratigraphic order, with the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Tertiary/Quaternary boundaries being most prominently displayed (Fig. 2A).

 

Excerpted from “Field guide to the geology of the University of the West Indies campus, Mona”, Stephen K. Donovan and Trevor A. Jackson, Caribbean J. of Earth Sciences, 2000 at http://www.mona.uwi.edu/geoggeol/JamGeolSoc/CJES%20Web%20page/CJESpdf/CJES%2034-3-Donovan.pdf

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